Make Mobility and Biomechanical Health a Priority

Physical Activity and Movement Part 13

We must maintain the physical machine that is our body. To do so, we require time to recover, stretch, and lengthen our muscles, and allow our connective tissues to unwind. Our bodies rely on mobility for healthy movement so being mindful of biomechanics is especially important.

The main goal is that you release taut bands of muscle, lengthen muscles, and reduce tension on connective tissues so that you avoid injury.

You can incorporate this activity in an every-other-day pattern, or twice a week. This can be part of your rest days, and you can also have rest days where all you do is take a gentle walk and not do a lot else. You can incorporate this as part of your daily routine, in 10-15 minute intervals using different techniques. The main goal is that you release taut bands of muscle, lengthen muscles, and reduce tension on connective tissues so that you avoid injury.

This can reduce your risk of bursitis, tendonitis, ligament injuries, stress fractures, as well as chronic muscular pain. There are many ways of achieving this kind of routine in your life. Some of the most effective include yoga or Pilates programs. Consider taking a class and identify a 15-20-minute program that you can do on a daily basis. Gentle yoga can be done in the evening before bedtime as a way of preparing yourself for sleeping and actually improving your sleep.

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I am a fan of Pilates. Foam rolling, myofascial release, and many dynamic forms of stretching can help with that kind of program. There are many free Pilates programs available on YouTube.

I also recommend massage therapy. I believe that regular massage therapy is one of the best ways to maintain biomechanical health. If you can’t afford it, see if there is a massage therapy school in your community. Often, the students will be able to give you massages at a reduced rate.

Activities that combine stretches, gentle movements, and breathing, such as qi gong and tai chi, are also very helpful. The list goes on and on, and they all have their benefits.

Allowing your body to recover and rebuild is a very important part of maintaining physical and mental health.

I personally do many different programs over time because they all have different benefits. Some days I’m foam rolling. I try to incorporate a form of yoga at least once a week. I work with a massage therapist. I perform a group of stretches known as ELDOA for improving postural strength and reducing pressure on my spine. I have gone through a qi gong course, and I will use that program at times.

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You get the idea. There are many different ways to accomplish this goal, but you should be sure to get it done. I now try to incorporate these types of activities as part of my daily routine. When I first get out of bed, I do a series of gentle calisthenics and shaking of my body, followed by dynamic stretches. I will do a few yoga poses throughout my workday. I might roll my feet on massage balls or golf balls. I will do various forms of stretches, such as my ELDOA stretches in between office visits. In the evening, I might do some foam rolling, and then sometimes take an Epsom salt bath. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, but you get the idea.

Allowing your body to recover and rebuild is a very important part of maintaining physical and mental health. Mobility and biomechanical health programs are essential for long term health.


If you’re interested in learning more about physical movement or a more personalized approach to healthcare, order my book Authentic Health, like my page on Facebook, and follow me on Instagram!